What I learnt from Dorie Clark’s Body Language for Women

A few weeks back, I watched all 29 minutes and 44 seconds of Dorie Clark’s Body language for Women on LinkedIn Learning. One of my main motivations in choosing this particular course out of all available was its duration and seeming complexity (rather, lack thereof). It was a Tuesday night, I was tired from work, but I just wanted to learn something; anything that would add more value to my personality and I could feel great about afterwards. This was the best fit — it was short and doable. Plus I’d get a certificate in the end, which suited my vanity well. And after all, how mentally taxing could it possibly be to process a course on body language and behaviour, of all things? So I decided to give it a shot.

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No Country For Women

Most of you know about the horrific rape that happened in New Delhi on the 16th of December 2012, when 23-year-old Jyoti Singh, a medical intern in New Delhi was brutally raped and murdered by six men, well five men and a minor. An L-shaped iron rod was used both to beat and penetrate her during the act, causing severe injuries to her abdomen, intestines and genitals. She was flown to Singapore’s Mount Elizabeth Hospital for a multiple organ transplant, but it was too late. She died of a cardiac arrest during the 6-hour flight. What followed was a movement to bring the perpetrators to justice. Public demonstrations, protests, international awareness, media efforts and a mass response to outrageously sexist remarks led to what came closest to justice. Ultimately, four out of five of the men got death sentences, while the juvenile was let off after a year in remand. I remember feeling sick to the stomach, but also hopeful. Maybe now, things would change. Maybe these men, if you could call them that, would think twice before committing such morbid acts of sin. I wish I were right.

Six years later, matters have worsened. Another gangrape, but this time it’s 8-year old Asifa Bano. One juvenile and seven men, including four police officers. Asifa’s legs were broken and nails had turned blue. If this sounds disturbing, listen to this: around the same time, an 8-month old baby girl was raped by her cousin, with injuries to her vital organs. This is one of many, each as repulsive as the other.

So what are we missing?

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